Art Foundation of Desert Hot Springs

UNITING OUR CREATIVE COMMUNITY, IGNITING OUR CREATIVE ECONOMY


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PSFAF is Now: Art Palm Springs


patricia-ann-parenti-cognac-wellerlane-rick-friedman-cindy-lou-wakefieldLast year, Rick Friedman, former Owner and President of Hamptons Expo Group (HEG), sold the entire art show lineup consisting of the Palm Springs Fine Art Fair (PSFAF), Art Aspen, Art Hamptons, and Houston Art Fair to Urban Expositions of Kennesaw, GA.

Urban, a full service trade show organizer, had broken into the large scale, international art show market with its 2013 acquisition of SOFA Chicago, Chicago’s longest continuously running gallery-presented art fair. With the acquisition of HEG, in partnership with the UK-based Clarion Events, Urban now operates an impressive roster of high end art shows.

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In a 2015 press release, it was reported that Friedman would continue to act as consultant on the shows and much of the management personnel from the events would be retained. Quotes from Friedman and Donna Davies, Director of SOFA, made it sound as if the leadership from the existing shows would work collaboratively on the whole lineup. Davies spoke of “expanding into new markets” and Friedman touted the “exhilarating collecting environment we plan for our fairgoers in 2016.

However, this year with the new name and the rather stark, minimalist branding style, the scropped-aps_logo_blk1how is offering a reduced number of complimentary passes for its cultural partners, and now has a restriction on the use of cameras by the general public. There is no mention of Friedman or HEG in any of the press releases. The most recent search result for “Friedman” that comes up on the website is a KESQ interview that looks to be from the 2015 show.

So, despite the typical claims that things will remain the same or be even better than previous years, its starting to look a lot like what one would expect from a partnership of one company that owns 40 events, and another that operates over 200 in a variety of different industries and topics. In contrast to the the privately owned, single purpose Hamptons Expo Group that was dedicated to its own art shows and nothing else, it feels a little like the focus is shifting to the money and away from the art. 31519399192_57513c37ab_z

It’s a little disturbing when things like this happen in the art world. It’s expected in industries like design, entertainment, gaming, or technology. But fine art is supposed to exist on a higher plane and for a greater purpose. People donated and volunteered for PSFAF, even though it was not operated by a nonprofit, because it was done for the love of art and to the taste of art lovers. snow-white

Everything about it just felt right in 2015, my first year covering the event for AFDHS. Last year, it looked the same and a lot of the same energy was present in the artists and galleries. But, it didn’t quite feel the same somehow.

I’m hoping that this year, despite the little details that feel like corners being cut, the new ownership will redeem themselves and bring us a truly inspiring experience.

Share your thoughts in the comments. We’d love to hear what others think about the changes to this signature art event.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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The alternative art school movement


An exciting concept for arts education: Alternative Art Schools with distance learning capabilities. It’s an exciting idea because one of the problems with the, now decades old, models like North Carolina’s Black Mountain College, was that they were kind of removed from the actual art scenes going on around the world. They were cool retreats and fonts of creative synthesis for those that attended but the revelations and developments achieved there had a hard time getting noticed by the rest of the world.

Add the Internet to the equation and you get a global, realtime, overlay of perhaps even multiple alternative schools with “students” and “teachers” who are actively participating in their diverse communities’ scenes and projects.

It seems a perfect time for this to emerge, with digital arts increasingly becoming a part of public art projects and arts organizations’ offerings, immersive video and 3D printing technologies blurring the lines between the virtual and physical. The idea of being able to not only discuss and share ideas with other artists across the globe, but to actually use their work in a project local to you, or vice versa, is pretty intriguing. And, the prospect of making this type of interaction part of a freeform, lifetime educational network for creatives is kind of mind blowing. I think it actually serves the original concept of many alternative arts schools in ways that were just not technologically possible until now.

So, is anybody involved in an alternative arts education program? Would anybody like to start one or connect with others interested in the toipic? Please comment.

re:sculpt | International Sculpture Center

school-desks-feature

“Back to school” sounds good to children (who get to see their friends every day again) and to their parents (who get to not see their children for a number of hours every week day), but adults often find that their own schooling – say, earning a Master of Fine Arts degree – can be a hassle, what with the job, the kids, the cost of tuition, moving. Tuition for an MFA in sculpture at the Maryland Institute College of Art currently runs $43,760 for a full year (and it is a two-and-a-half year program), and then there are a range of required and optional fees, and we haven’t even gotten to food and accommodations. The low-residency MFA in studio art at the college is exactly half the cost of the full-time rate, which may be more palatable but still a big chunk of change.

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Safest and Least Safe Towns in California


You may be shocked to learn some of the cities that ranked as less safe than Desert Hot Springs in this study by research firm, Value Penguin.

Of the 416 communities in the report, Desert Hot Springs ranked at #371 where #1 was the safest. Take a look at the towns that ranked below Desert Hot Springs and you’ll probably be surprised to find Palm Springs, Big Bear Lake, West Hollywood, and Berkley!

Desert Hot Springs
San Leandro
Berkeley
El Centro
Capitola
Merced
Hawthorne
Clearlake
Tulare
Gridley
Hemet
Salinas
West Hollywood
Barstow
Dinuba
Big Bear Lake
Sacramento
San Pablo
Bakersfield
Fresno
Redding
Santa Fe Springs
Antioch
Oroville
Richmond
Grass Valley
Compton
Vallejo
Palm Springs
Anderson
Commerce
Santa Cruz
Modesto
Red Bluff
San Bernardino
Eureka
San Francisco
Stockton
Oakland
Emeryville


Tall Tales, Healing Stitches, Carol Larson “TALLGIRL Series” Petaluma Arts Council, August 8, 2009


If anyone is still skeptical about fiber arts being capable of deeply poignant expressions as fine art objects, you definitely need to meet Carol Larson of Petaluma, CA.

ART hound

The Bullies, 2006, 59"x34", commercial fabrics, digitally printed words.

Last weekend, I met artist Carol Larson whose “Tallgirl Series” of two dozen mixed media fiber collages was exhibited at the Petaluma Art Center in conjunction with the annual Petaluma Quilt Show.  The quilt show is an annual one day extravaganza sponsored by the Petaluma Museum Association involving quilt displays at several downtown Petaluma venues and it draws a huge crowd from all over the Bay Area.  The Art Council’s sponsorship of Carol Larson, along with its recent shows devoted to Indian textiles, indicate the center’s strong support for fiber artists.  A large audience turned up at the Art Center for Larson’s talk, which is no surprise—since the center’s opening last year, every event has been packed to capacity, indicating our community’s hunger for interaction with artists.  The Center’s decision to focus on Larson, a fiber artist, during the local quilt show, indicates it is doing its job…prodding us to take note of the possibilities inherent…

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